Indian Journal of Drugs in Dermatology

TABLE
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 115--116

Drug-induced fever versus infection-induced fever


Sagar Jugtawat, Bhagyashri Daulatabadkar, Sushil Pande 
 Department of Dermatology, NKP Salve Institute of Medical Sciences and Lata Mangeshkar Hospital, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Sagar Jugtawat
Department of Dermatology, NKP Salve Institute of Medical Sciences and Lata Mangeshkar Hospital, Nagpur, Maharashtra
India




How to cite this article:
Jugtawat S, Daulatabadkar B, Pande S. Drug-induced fever versus infection-induced fever.Indian J Drugs Dermatol 2016;2:115-116


How to cite this URL:
Jugtawat S, Daulatabadkar B, Pande S. Drug-induced fever versus infection-induced fever. Indian J Drugs Dermatol [serial online] 2016 [cited 2022 Jan 28 ];2:115-116
Available from: https://www.ijdd.in/text.asp?2016/2/2/115/196224


Full Text

Drug-induced fever is a disorder characterized by a febrile response coinciding temporally with the administration of a drug in the absence of underlying conditions that can be responsible for the fever. Fever is a common symptom in day-to-day clinical practice, and a large number of indoor admissions are attributed to patients suffering from fever. Many of these patients are also put on anti-infective agents such as antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals, or antiparasitic drugs, considering infections as the predominant cause of fever. However, drugs initiated for the treatment of underlying diseases can be a cause of fever in such setting. It is a diagnostic dilemma to differentiate between infection-induced fever and drug-induced fever. The following table enlists differences between the two so as to help physician to differentiate between the two to take appropriate decisions. The distinction is especially important with regard to drug discontinuation and decision regarding the initiation of corticosteroid treatment [Table 1].{Table 1}[10]

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